Aspect Security's AppSec Blog

Insecure HTTP Header Removal

 This page is a collection of instructions to remove unnecessary server headers which may be reported as part of a Penetration Test performed by a security engineer or reported via automated tools. I have cataloged these remediation instructions for many technologies in one place to save the vast amounts of searching required for some of the more obscure technologies.

Each section below is be divided into a short solution and along with a longer one. The “Short Answer” gives the quick means to remove the offending header while the “Long Answer” gives more details along with alternate and (perhaps) more thorough solutions.

Why bother? In general, excessive headers are bad:

  • They expose what version of software is running on the server, reducing the work an attacker needs to do before trying to attack the system.
  • Headers are the same for a normal user or an attacker. So, a known long string of characters in an encrypted data stream might aid an attacker in cracking open the encrypted TLS connection of another user.
  • It’s a general waste of bandwidth and processing power.

Shadow Bank pwn: Cheating a Hackathon for Fun and Profit

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Introduction

A few weeks ago my friend (1) and I attended a hackathon sponsored by a local ISSA chapter (2). The hackathon was a hands-on event where participants learned about common web application vulnerabilities in a fun, gamified environment. The technical platform for this hackathon was provided by Security Innovation (3).

At the end of the event, the two of us finished first and second, with nearly half of the available points each. Security Innovation, however, graciously kept the game open for a few more days to give the participants an opportunity to continue to play and learn.

We used this opportunity to find and exploit more vulnerabilities in the application, and ultimately discover the one that allowed us to completely own the application server.

Accidental Offensive Security: Analysis of Buffer Overrun in a Security Tool

During a project working with Hydra, a Network Login Auditor, we discovered and corrected a buffer overrun issue with possible security implications that might include the auditor being attacked by the auditee.

TL;DR Attacker using Hydra or Medusa can get pwn'd by the victim website responding with remote code execution via buffer overrun exploit.

Deserialization Attacks via Apache Commons Collections

On November 6, Stephen Breen of Foxglove Security (@breenmachine) published a blog post outlining vulnerabilities in components of several Java Web Application Servers (WebSphere, JBoss, and WebLogic) as well as a popular development automation framework (Jenkins). 

All of these vulnerabilities follow a similar pattern. And as worrying as that is, it's only the tip of the iceberg (as Foxglove’s post articulates)

So what can you do? This blog post will provide background and information on how to defend against vulnerabilities in Java serialization introduced by Apache Commons Collections affecting common Web App Servers such as WebSphere, JBoss, and Web Logic, as well as common applications like Jenkins.